Bethlehem, Make Ready

Christmas music is on the radio. Christmas trees are in houses. Santa is at the mall.

And it’s November 30. When my students ask me if my Christmas tree is up, I say no. It’s not going up until December 23. (I tell them that it’s because that’s the last day of school before break, so putting up my tree while listening to The Muppet Christmas Carol soundtrack and sipping hot chocolate is the perfect start to break for me.) They ask why I didn’t put it up last weekend or some time this week.

Because it’s November freaking 30. It’s not winter yet. We had a predicted high of 58 degrees today. Yes, the next few days will cool off, but it’s too warm for Christmas in my mind. It’s too early for Christmas. Besides, before we can have Christmas, we need to prepare for Christmas.

Preparing for Christmas isn’t just about shopping or baking or cleaning your house. You also need to prepare yourself for Christmas. On Sunday, I put out three “Christmas” decorations. I put out my Nutcracker music box/snow globes that are more about winter than Christmas for me, and I set up the Nativity scene. Jesus is NOT in the manger yet; he’s chilling in my jewelry box. The Magi are looking through a stable window because they have a long way to come. It’s a long trip from Persia to Bethlehem; we aren’t at Bethlehem yet. But like Bethlehem, we need to prepare ourselves for the coming of our King.

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It’s the feast of St. Andrew today. One thing that I’ve always enjoyed about the Fast of Philip/Advent is the way that the Church gifts us with the feasts of certain Saints who point us towards Christ in a special way in the weeks leading up to Christmas. Andrew invites each of us as he invited his brother, Peter, to come and see the Lord. (John 1:40-42) Several Old Testament prophets have their feasts in the next few weeks; each stands as a reminder of God’s love for people. St. Barbara (December 4) reminds us of the sacrificial nature that our love for God ought to have. St. Nicholas (December 6) reminds us that we are called to give of ourselves both to God and others. (He always reminds us to punch heretics in the face.) A few days later, the Conception of St. Anna reminds us of the faithfulness of God’s promises to us.

And so on…there are many feasts to point us to the coming of Christ. I love the feast of Our Lady of Guadalupe (the patroness of the Americas) for many reasons. St. Lucy whose feast falls eight days before the Winter Solstice in a season of long nights and darkness reminds us that the light shines in the darkness and the darkness cannot overcome it. (John 1:5) These feasts are here to remind us to focus our gaze on Bethlehem.

I’ve been feeling a bit like Ebeneezer Scrooge this week because I’m not ready for Christmas trees or music despite the fact that the secular world is. But perhaps that’s the point. It isn’t just the calendar or the weather. I’m not ready for Christmas. I have work to do before my heart will be ready for Christmas. As I said earlier this month, during the Fast of Philip, I’m focusing on how the Lord can satisfy all of my needs and is in fact all that I need. I can still grow in that area. (Okay, I’ll always have room for growth in that area.) But I’m not ready for Christmas. I still have spiritual prep for Christmas. My personal Bethlehem is not ready for Christ. I need to make myself ready to welcome Christ.

When Christmas is actually upon us, I will put up the tree and set up the Christmas decorations. First, I’ll prepare myself spiritually, and then I’ll decorate my home. Bethlehem has to be ready before the king can come. Similarly, I must be ready. I must make my heart ready in order to welcome the King of Kings into my heart this Christmas and every day of my life.

Make ready, O Bethlehem, for Eden is opened.
Prepare, O Ephratha, for Adam and Eve are renewed.
Salvation enters the world and the curse is destroyed.
Make ready, O hearts of righteous men,
Instead of myrrh, bring songs as an offering of wisdom.
Receive salvation and immortality for your bodies and souls.
Behold, the Master Who lays in a manger
urges us to complete our spiritual songs.
Let us cry to Him without ceasing: O Lord, glory to Thee.

-Vespers for December 23

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