We Need Lent

In my spare time, I enjoy listening to the videos on the St. Elias Ukrainian Greek Catholic Church’s YouTube Channel. I find the music to beautiful and prayerful in a way that enriches my life. In particular, I enjoy listening to the videos from Holy Week and Pascha. I’ve been finding myself getting really excited as I realize that this coming Sunday is Cheesefare Sunday. Now, as a Lent-hating child, I hated Cheesefare Sunday. It (like the liturgical season it precedes) ruined all my fun.

As an adult with a better appreciation of Lent, I adore Cheesefare Sunday. My favorite thing about Cheesefare Sunday is Forgiveness Vespers. During Forgiveness Vespers, we as a parish forgive one another. “Forgive me, a sinner, and I forgive you,” we say to one another. It is, to me, utterly beautiful. During this Ritual of Forgiveness, we sing the Odes of the Resurrection, music that we will hear again during Resurrection Matins (my absolute favorite service of the year) on Pascha Sunday and throughout the Paschal season. Now, I love love LOVE these odes. I’m so excited to get to sing these beautiful odes, these beautiful truths on Sunday.

But not only do I love Pascha, I love Holy Thursday and Good Friday. I cannot explain to you how much I love Good Friday’s Reading of the Twelve Gospels and Entombment Vespers. They are so beautiful to me. I canNOT wait to sing “Having suffered the Passion for us, Jesus Christ Son of God, have mercy on us” throughout Lent. And then, we’ll get to sing of the Noble Joseph (of Arimathea) who took down the Spotless Body of the Master from the Cross and laid Him in a new tomb on Good Friday. Love. I love singing of the Noble Joseph because I love the Noble Joseph.

I love this celebration. It is utterly beautiful. Over the course of several days, we journey with Christ from Bethany where He raises His friend, Lazarus, from the dead to His triumphal entry into Jerusalem through Holy Week to Holy Thursday and the Institution of the Eucharist and the Priesthood to the Agony in the Garden into Friday and the Carrying of the Cross and His Passion and Death and then comes Pascha-His Glorious Resurrection on the Third Day. Christ is victorious through it all. He is the Victor. I love it.

You, O King and Lord, have fallen asleep in the flesh as a mortal man but on the third day you arose. You have raised Adam from his corruption and made death powerless. You are the Pasch of incorruption. You are the salvation of the world.

I recently confessed my love of Holy Week to my roommate. I told her that I wanted it to be Holy Week now because I want that beauty. I want that glory in my life. But her response was perfect. She told me that I couldn’t have them yet because Holy Week wouldn’t be the same without Lent. If I don’t go through forty days of prayer, almsgiving, and fasting, the majesty of Holy Week is NOT the same. Lent leads us to Holy Week. We need to work our way through Lent to the glory and majesty of the Sacred and Holy Pasch. We need to prepare our hearts and minds to rightly celebrate the Great Feast.

From the Monastery of Christ the Bridegroom

From the Monastery of Christ the Bridegroom

I love Holy Week. I love Pascha. But I need to spend some time preparing for those celebrations. I need to take time (forty days sounds good) to focus my mind on the message of Holy Week and Pascha so that I can properly celebrate the feasts. I need my heart and mind to be focused on the love and mercy of Christ’s Victorious Passion. Prayer can do that. Fasting can do that. Almsgiving can do that. I need to focus my heart and my mind. I need to work on my relationship with God. And then, I can celebrate the Feast well.

And if you’re wondering, I do need to do this every year. Every year, I can grow more. Every year, I can find areas for improvement in my relationship with God and in my understanding of His love and mercy. I will never be perfect on this side of paradise. But the beauty of God is that He is always there for me to draw closer to and to know more fully. We all need this. We all need the opportunity to meet God in the wilderness and to prepare ourselves for the Resurrection.

The Beauty of Geography

Recently, I was thinking about how I came to be Byzantine Catholic, and I realized that the easiest way to explain it is that it’s an accident of geography. My dad’s maternal grandparents came to America from a part of Europe that was Slovakia at the time and settled near Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; they eventually ended up in the metro Detroit area where my Byzantine Catholic grandmother married my never-baptized but ostensibly Protestant grandfather and had four children. (Happy side note: My grandfather was baptized in a Byzantine Catholic Church about a year ago at the age of 92. I still get teary-eyed with joy thinking about it.) Then, my Byzantine Catholic father, the youngest of those four children, married my Roman Catholic mother who embraced the Byzantine Catholic Church, my brother and I were born, and they raised us to know and love that Church.

There’s a lot that feels a bit random in that narrative. My dad’s grandparents happened to be from a Byzantine Catholic region of Eastern Europe. Give or take a few miles, and they’d have been Orthodox or Roman Catholic. But by what some might call an accident of geography, they were Byzantine Catholic. I don’t know how strong the catechesis of my ancestors was. I don’t know how much they understood about their faith, but that doesn’t matter. They continued the motion of a chain of events that led to me being Byzantine Catholic.

The reality is that none of this is random. God doesn’t deal in coincidences or accidents. It was not actually due to an accident of geography that I was born into a Byzantine Catholic family. I was born into this family and this Church because it was where God wants me. There is a reason that I was born into this Church and not into the Roman Catholic Church or an Orthodox Church, and that reason is the will of God.

In my experience, the Eastern Catholic Churches sit in a complicated position. Not everyone loves our existence. I can’t count the number of times I’ve been asked when I’m going to get off the fence and become Orthodox or Roman Catholic. I’ve been told that it would be easier to just become Orthodox. Perhaps it would. But easier isn’t always the best option or the right one. God has a purpose for the Byzantine Catholic Churches. In a talk he gave last September, Patriarch Sviatoslav Shevchuk of the Ukrainian Greek Catholic Church defines the Byzantine Catholic Churches as living out the spirit of the first Christian millennium; that is we live out an Orthodox spirituality and theology while living in communion with the See of Rome. He sees us as living out the call of Christ for His people to dwell in full and loving unity. Diversity ought to be allowed, accepted, and embraced.

I could go on about that for ages, but that’s a digression. I believe that the Byzantine Catholic Churches have a beautiful purpose in our world. I believe that we need to be vocal in showing the world the beauty of our Church. We are a living and active representation of heaven on earth, and we must live that out in a way that radiates into the lives of those around us. I firmly believe that we are called to show the beauty of unity to the world by our lives. Yes, we hold a complicated position, but it does not follow that this position ought to be abandoned because of difficulty.

There is beauty in this difficulty. I’ve talked before about the difficulty of being an Eastern Catholic both in an ecumenical environment and in strictly Catholic environments. It is not easy to be the minority or the other. And at times it does feel as though some obnoxious accident of geography put me in this place. But it wasn’t an accident that put me in this place. It was God, and if God put me here, then there is beauty in this complicated place.

It may not always be obvious beauty. It may not always be easy to look past external complications. Yes, Byzantine Catholicism is aesthetically pleasing. I love the sensory experience of my church. It is is a gorgeous place to be. The music is beautiful. The people (at least in my experience) are wonderful. However, the disunity of the Christian body can be discouraging and ugly.

It is hard to know leaders of other Churches believe that my Church is the greatest obstacle to unity between the Christian East and Christian West. It’s hurtful to be called a “uniate.” On the other hand, I can understand that it is hurtful to other Churches that my Church reestablished communion with the See of Rome several hundred years ago. Yes, we acted from political reasons more than religious/spiritual, and I can easily see why that’s hurtful to others. We have to accept that and work with it; we cannot ignore the hurt in the hopes it will go away. The wounds need to be acknowledged and discussed.

Christian unity is a complex thing. Yes, we are called to unity, but we are called to unity in diversity as St. John Paul II said. It’s important to highlight our common ground, but it’s also important to acknowledge our differences and discuss them. We need to embrace our brokenness and take it to the Cross, to the One who heals all wounds. Christ alone can heal the brokenness of our Church. He can bring great goodness into this situation and out of it.

In closing, it is the beauty of geography that made me Byzantine Catholic rather than Roman Catholic or Orthodox. The geography that wrought this situation is beautiful because it was made by God. God the Father may not have willed the brokenness of His Son’s body. He may not rest well pleased with the wounds within the Church. But that absolutely does not mean that He will abandon His Church, the Bride of Christ to perish in brokenness. No, Jesus comes to make all things new (Rev. 21:15), and He will use anything to do that. He will use politics, geography, humble prayers, conversations, ecumenical action…God will use anything that comes from a sincere desire to serve His Kingdom to make this thing new.

And maybe we won’t see the Church fully restored on this side of Paradise, but we have not been abandoned. He is a God of restoration and renewal, not a God of accidents. He makes beautiful things out of us. He wants this Church, His Church to be whole. And to do that, he’s going to use all of us-Orthodox, Roman Catholics, Byzantine Catholics, Protestants…we’re all called to this table. We’re all called to unity. We are called to be One as the Trinity is One.

Father God, heal and restore Your Church. Make us One as the Trinity is One. Renew and restore Your people. Break down walls, and heal wounds. Give wisdom to Church leaders, and give hope to Your people. Father, make us one. 


(This is the other well-known article about the region of Europe from which my ancestors came. March 15, 1939 was our big day; we should celebrate that more.)

God descends in mortal flesh!

On Wednesday evening, I was thinking about the idea of being halfway out of the dark and how the days begin to lengthen as the night lessens, how we must decrease like the darkness and Christ must increase like the light. (John 3:30) As I thought, I found myself singing a song to myself. “What no man could hope for now conceived/ earth is raised to heaven on this eve.” This song by the brilliant Ed Conlin (who I am blessed to know at least a bit) was inspired by St. John Chrysostom’s most famous Christmas homily.

Now as an Eastern Christian, I am contractually obligated to love the Golden-Tongued Saint. I aspire to name a son after him and St. Cyril-the one of Sts. Cyril and Methodius. (The other are lovely, but the Non-Mercenary brothers evangelized my people, the Slavs.) But this particular homily is really special to me. It speaks to my heart a unique way. This homily defines Christmas joy and hope for my heart and mind. St. John Chrysostom speaks to me in a way that allows me to taste the beauty of the Incarnation.

All exalt His glory. All join to praise this holy feast, beholding the Godhead here on earth, and man in heaven. He Who is above, now for our redemption dwells here below; and he that was lowly is by divine mercy raised.

The Godhead here on earth, and man in heaven…that is a divine and marvelous mystery indeed. A God who departs the heavens who live with his little “mud people” and raises them up to his heavens-that is a mystery. As the Eastern fathers say, God became man so that man might become God. (Apparently, I picked up a little bit from all of those Fr. Hopko talks my dad made me listen to as a kid.) This is something that I love to think about and struggle with. God became man. He descended so that we might ascend. Why? Because he loves us, he loves us at a total risk to himself. He loves people who desert him and ignore him and reject him and deny him and betray him…and he loves us. Regardless of anything we do, he loves us.

This day He Who is, is Born; and He Who is, becomes what He was not. For when He was God, He became man; yet not departing from the Godhead that is His.

He is born. He comes into the world. He is born in poverty. He is born in a manger. He who set the stars in motion condescends to be born so that he might raise us up with him and make us to sit in heavenly places. My mind boggles with this. I can accept the basic facts of the Incarnation. God becomes a human infant in the womb of the Theotokos. He is born in Bethlehem. He grows up to adulthood and so forth. I can accept the facts. But to actually think it all through-God becomes a human being while remaining God from before all ages. His incarnation does not change him; it changes us.

And ask not how: for where God wills, the order of nature yields.

Let me say that again. The incarnation does not change God; it changes us. God cannot change or be changed; we humans can and must change.  I don’t have to understand how this happens. God willed it. Nature yielded to God as all things must. That is enough for me. It is enough for all of us. God became man, and in doing so, he changed our humanity. He raised us up when we were powerless, when we were sinners. He entered into our humanity. He felt our pain, our struggle, our hunger, our need-and he loved us in that. He redeemed us in that.

He gives me His spirit; and so He bestowing and I receiving, He prepares for me the treasure of Life. He takes my flesh, to sanctify me; He gives me His Spirit, that He may save me.

He came to bring us back to himself. He would not be satisfied until he had won for us an eternal inheritance, that of salvation. He wanted us to see him, to know him. And so he put on mortal flesh. He became a human being out of love for us. He wanted to raise us up and make us to sit in heavenly places with us. (Ephesians 2:6) The Nativity is a central piece of that act, of that plan. God became man.

Because God is now on earth, and man in heaven; on every side all things commingle. He became Flesh. He did not become God. He was God. Wherefore He became flesh, so that He Whom heaven did not contain, a manger would this day receive.

God is now on earth. Let us rejoice! Let us celebrate the feast of the Incarnation. He who is God from before all ages has taken on human flesh, has become a sharer in our humanity so that he may redeem us. The Lord of Hosts has descended to earth. Let us observe the feast with great joy! All glory be to God.

Christ is born! Glorify him!

Christos Razdajetsja! – Slavite Jeho!

CHRISTOS GENNATAI! DOXASETE!

Your Birth, oh Christ our God, has shed upon the world the light of knowledge. For through it those who worshipped the stars have learned from a star to worship You, the Sun of Justice, and to know You, the Dawn from on high. Glory be to You, o Lord!

-Troparion for the Feast of the Nativity of Our Lord Jesus

Five Ways to Keep Millennials in the Church

I keep seeing posts about keeping millennials in the Church and how to draw them to the Lord. Some of the posts are good; others are bleh. But I decided to (as a millennial) write my own post. Here’s how the Church can keep the millennials she already has and draw more into Her life. 

  1. “Be who you are and be that well.”-St. Francis de Sales, Bishop of Geneva
  2. “If you are what you should be, you will set the whole world on fire!” -St. Catherine of Siena 
  3. Do NOT be satisfied with mediocrity! The world will offer you comfort. But you were not made for comfort. You were made for greatness!”  -St. John Paul II
  4. “Take away your eyes from yourself and rejoice that you have nothing–that you are nothing–that you can do nothing. Give Jesus a big smile each time your nothingness frightens you. Just keep the joy of Jesus as your strength–be happy and at peace, accept whatever He takes with a big smile.”-St. Teresa of Calcutta
  5. “I plead with you–never, ever give up on hope, never doubt, never tire, and never become discouraged. Be not afraid.” -St. John Paul II

Simply put, be Jesus. Live Jesus. Trust him. He’ll do the rest. 

Better Things Ahead

(Note: This post is published on this date intentionally. It was on this day in 1963 that C.S. Lewis departed this life in the hope of life eternal. May his memory be eternal.) 

It’s no secret to those who know me well that I love words. I have a Favorite Quotes board on Pinterest that is full of quotations and thoughts that I love. As I was looking over it recently, I realized that I have pinned one quote from C.S. Lewis several times. “There are far, far better things ahead than any we leave behind.”

Now, I love C.S. Lewis. That’s a known fact. I have many quotes from him on that Pinterest board. But clearly this quotation speaks to me at a deeper level. The quote is from Letters to an American Lady, and it is not meant to be optimistic about the future or a platitude for a graduation speech. Rather, it looks at and towards eternal life.

When I first realized that I had pinned this quotation at least three times, I was surprised. Yes, the quote is prettily formatted each time, but why did it keep popping up in my life? Why did I keep being encouraged and inspired by the same quotation? Yes, it’s from one of my favorite authors. Yes, the formatting is lovely. But why did the idea of better things ahead (in heaven) speak so strongly to me?

Some of it has to do with certain things that I’ve faced over the past few years. On difficult days, it is encouraging to look at this quote and remember that when we’ve shrugged off these mortal coils we will be in a place that is infinitely better. It’s also just a refreshing thought. When I’m slogging through a hard day, it’s nice to look at that quotation and realize that life won’t always be like this. Better days will come, and one day, a better place will come.

It’s also encouraging because it’s a very Biblical idea. This idea of better things ahead is something that the Lord has promised us.

And I heard a loud voice from the throne, saying, “Behold, the tabernacle of God is among men, and He will dwell among them, and they shall be His people, and God Himself will be among them, and He will wipe away every tear from their eyes; and there will no longer be any death; there will no longer be any mourning, or crying, or pain; the first things have passed away.”

And He who sits on the throne said, “Behold, I am making all things new.” And He said, “Write, for these words are faithful and true.” Then He said to me, “It is done. I am the Alpha and the Omega, the beginning and the end. I will give to the one who thirsts from the spring of the water of life without cost. He who overcomes will inherit these things, and I will be his God and he will be My son.

-Revelations 21: 2-7

Let me repeat my favorite piece of that. Behold, I am making all things new. When we get to the other side, all things will be made new. No more death, no more mourning or crying or pain-we can’t escape those things in this life. They’re part of life in this world. But when we enter eternal life, the former things will have passed away. In the new Jerusalem, we will have far better things than we could have ever imagined. And it will be so good.

But until that day, we live in hope. We live with our eyes fixed on what is to come.

Finding Focus

As I’ve mentioned before, I like to choose a focus for liturgical seasons such as the Fast of Philip (also known as Advent) and Great and Holy Lent. I usually start thinking and praying about a theme a week or two in advance, and if I’m lucky, I’ll stumble upon The Right One the day before the season begins.

This year, I knew that I wanted to work on incorporating Eastern Christian spirituality into my life more and more. To that end, this will be my first Fast of Philip incorporating Fr. Thomas Hopko’s The Winter Pascha into my morning prayer time. The book has forty short meditations-one for each day of the Fast. I purchased an icon of The Root of Jesse to give me a visible reminder of those who have come before me (and before the earthly life of Christ) in faith. (To be fair, I’m working on acquiring icons for all of the major feasts/seasons of the Church. It’s slow going.) All of this prep was done at least two weeks in advance of the impending fast.

But I also knew that I wanted a quotation or a verse from Scripture to pray through during the Fast. I ended up finding two things that really resonated with me.

The first is the chorus from a song that my parish sings on the Sundays of the Fast of Philip:

He shall be born unto us,

And God will be with us.

And we will find him in the cave at Bethlehem.

He shall be born unto us. This (Christmas, the celebration of Christ’s birth) isn’t just something that happened a long time ago. This is something that can happen here and now. If we open our hearts and allow ourselves to be taken to the cave at Bethlehem, God will be born into our hearts, into our lives. That’s an area where I want to grow during this season. I want to grow closer to God, and looking at his humility is a way for me to work on that.

The second quote is from Lady Julian of Norwich, and I think that it nicely continues the theme of the previous quote.

God, of your goodness give me yourself, for you are enough for me.

This is something that I’ve been praying through lately. I’m struggling through the idea that I fixate on “needing” things that I don’t need. I just need Jesus. I don’t need money or success or more yarn or a husband or all of the coffee in the world. I just need Jesus.

Scratch that. I need Jesus and more yarn. Shut up.

Okay, I don’t need more yarn. I want more yarn. All that I need is Jesus. He can meet all of my needs and wants. If it is his will, he will provide the rest. He is enough for me. That’s a fact that I know in my head, and I want to spend this season leading up to Christmas focusing on my only true need being a need for Jesus. My hope is that doing this will help me to grow closer to him and bring him into my heart more fully come Christmas and throughout the rest of my life.

(Dear Jesus, all that I want for Christmas is more yarn, all of the coffee in the world, and for you to be born in my heart. A pony would be nice, but all that I really need is you. Please complete me. And send coffee.)

But really, what do I really need to work on during this season of preparation for the Winter Pascha? I need more Jesus. I need to allow him into my heart and my life in a further and deeper way. I need to allow him to be born not only in the cave of Bethlehem but also in my heart. I need to depend only on him for my sustenance. He will provide all that I need.

Love.

I was unhappy when I awoke this morning. I probably would have been unhappy with either presidential candidate’s election, but the fact remains that I was unhappy. I went on Facebook prepared to post the following status: “Anybody know any good Byzantine Catholic men in Canada who’d like to marry a nice but stubborn American Byzantine Catholic lady? I like Canada.”

Then I looked at my “On This Day” feed. Apparently, on this day six years ago, I had posted one of my favorite quotes from St. John of the Cross. “In the evening of our lives, we will be judged on our love.”

I felt convicted by my twenty-two year old self. I’ll be judged on my love. I will be judged on how well I love others. In fact, realistically speaking, I’m always being judged by others (and by God) on how I treat other people. I need to treat others with love, with respect, and with kindness in all that I do. If I agree with them or disagree with them, I need to respect them. I need to love them.

There’s too much anger, too much fear in our world today. My nation is very divided, and that concerns me. But I insist on believing that people are worth loving. I may not always like them or understand them. But people are still inherently good even if they’re not always well-behaved. They deserve to be loved and to be respected. I don’t have to like everyone or agree with everyone. But I do need to love them.

Ultimately, my life isn’t judged by how other people treat me. God won’t say to me “Well, it’s okay that you were mean to those people because they were mean to your first.” He’s going to remind me that he called me to love others as he loved me, to treat others the way that I want to be treated. That’s true for all of us. We need to love always because ultimately that’s where the true measure of our lives is found.

Let’s live well. Let’s be respectful of others. Let’s love one another and show ourselves to be the best possible version of ourselves.

But if you know any good Byzantine Catholic men in Canada who are in search of a nice Byzantine Catholic woman, send them my way. You can tell them that I like Canada, but please just warn them that I’m really stubborn.